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Payette County Commissioners expected to vote on AEHI proposed nuclear power plant April 23, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, approval process, Payette County, public opinion, rural nuclear, Uncategorized.
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EAGLE, IDAHO – April 23, 2010 – Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (OTCBB: AEHI) — Payette County Commissioners are expected to announce their decision Monday, April 26th at 11:00 AM concerning a change to the county’s comprehensive plan.  If approved, it would open the door to a proposal to build a nuclear power plant near New Plymouth, Idaho.

Commissioners currently have four different plan changes to choose from, all of which work very well for a nuclear power plant.  Should they choose the AEHI proposal, the company can then move forward on plans to rezone the property from agricultural to industrial.

“The county and an overwhelming majority of residents have already spoken out at a number of public meetings, telling the commissioners they want nuclear power in their community, and I believe the commissioners paid close attention to those requests,” said Don Gillispie, AEHI CEO.

The change to the comprehensive plan not only makes it possible to use the 5,000 acre parcel near Big Willow Road and Stone Quarry Road for industrial purposes, but it is worded specifically for a nuclear power plant.  This means the plan would allow for an industrial complex on the land only if that complex is a nuclear power plant.

The proposal has met with a great deal of support in Payette County, since the plant is expected to produce around 5,000 jobs through construction, and more than 1,000 jobs during operations.  Those jobs average $60,000 and $80,000 respectively.

The revenue during construction is also attractive to the county and the state.  Idaho will see an increase of $5.3 billion to its GDP and $4.8 billion of that money will flow directly through Payette County.

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (http://www.alternateenergyholdings.com/) — Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources. The company is the nation’s only independent nuclear power plant developer seeking to build new power plants in multiple non-nuclear states. Other projects include Energy Neutral, which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (http://www.energyneutralinc.com/), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generation), and International Reactors, which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications. AEHI China, headquartered in Beijing, develops joint ventures to produce nuclear plant components and consults on nuclear power. AEHI Korea, Seoul, is assisting KEPCO (Korea Electric Power Corporation) to export their APR 1400 reactor into the US and achieve NRC design certification.

“Safe Harbor” Statement: This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate. As a result, investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

Water usage and nuclear power plants April 23, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in nuclear industry, Water policy.
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Water usage and nuclear power plants is little known in the U.S., even in areas where water is at a premium such as in the semi-arid western states, where most of the fresh water is consumed in this country. Here are the facts:

  • About 80% is used for irrigation and much of that is for golf courses, lawns, parks, recreation fields, swimming pools and commercial property beautification. 2 billion gallons per day is used on golf courses alone.
  • Approximately 10% is used for industry and business.
  • About 7% is used for household use including some irrigation.
  • The remainder, around 3.0% is used for thermal power plants. Nuclear, coal, combined cycle gas, CSP solar and geothermal are thermal plants.  Coal plants are by far the largest user, followed by nuclear plants, and finally combined cycle gas plants in order of power production.

Figures from the above graph are very similar for Idaho except only about .01% of the fresh water is used for thermal power plants.

Note:
It is critical to point out just how much water leaves southern Idaho on an annual basis without ever being used.  In fact, 7,900,000 acre feet of water leaves the state every year via the Snake River, which has the Payette River as one of its tributaries
.

A proposed nuclear power plant in Payette County would use less than 1% of this water.

(Source: SPF Water Engineering)

What sources of electricity require the most water?

  • There are 2400 hydroelectric plants in the United States that require the largest amount of water than any other power producer.  However, hydro plants only produce 7% of the nation’s electricity and around 40% in Idaho, which is decreasing according to the Athena report. (http://www.harvestcleanenergy.org/IdahoEnergy/IdahoEnergyFuture_PR.pdf)  While there is some evaporation behind the dams, much of the water is held for production of often small amounts of power instead of flood control even when the water is needed in semi-arid climates for crop irrigation and industry.  There are no emissions with hydro, however, these plants negatively impact the environment in a variety of ways including fish passage and silting.
  • There are 600 coal plants in the U.S., which require more water than any other thermal power source due to the large number of units.  Coal produces 50% of the nation’s electricity, but they have the worst emissions of all power sources.  Many of these emissions contain mercury, sulfur and CO2.
  • There are 104 nuclear plants in the U.S. which use less water with fewer units than coal.  Nuclear power plants produce 20% of the nation’s electricity and 70% of all emission-free electricity.
  • Combine-cycle gas plants use the least amount of water of all the major power sources because they are the smallest power contributor.  However, these plants are rapidly growing in number and emit a large amount of CO2, although those emissions are about half the amount of an equivalent size coal plant.
  • Geothermal plants produce less than 1% of the nation’s power and use water much like any equivalent size thermal plant.  However, many of these plants have to inject water into the earth, which requires even more of this valuable resource.
  • Solar power plants, while contributing less than 1% of our electricity, use more water than thermal plants to wash the panels and for cooling of Concentrated Solar Power (CSP).
  • Almost all thermal power plants require about the same amount of water to cool a megawatt using conventional cooling methods.

Nuclear plant water usage:

There is a great deal of misinformation surrounding nuclear plant water usage often propagated by opponents of nuclear power. Water is recirculated for cooling of the power plant and it is consumed by the plant as well.  Here’s a look at the facts:

  • The power block in a steam-cycle plant, which actually produces the power, will consume between 50,000 to 100,000 gallons per day depending on the design and operations.
  • The workers at the plant will consume 500,000 to 700,000 gallons for day for toilets, cooking, washing and other general industrial usage.
  • AEHI’s design will use a hybrid cooling system that will control consumption depending on water availability to less than one million gallons per day or 1000 acre-feet per year (140 acres irrigated) for the steam cycle and plant usage (listed above) if required due to water shortage. This minimum consumptive mode is known as dry cooling.
  • Depending on the reactor’s total power and the cooling system design, the plant can recirculate up to 20 to 25 million gallons per day for cooling. In this cooling system, water is pumped from the water source (river) to fill ponds near the power plant.  It is then circulated from one pond into the plant for cooling, afterwards the water is returned to another pond to cool before being sent back to the first pond to use again. These ponds will be filled when water flow in the river is high.
  • Many older nuclear plants use high water consumptive cooling up to 90% of the recirculated water (such as cooling towers which are spray evaporative cooling) and were built where water was abundant from large rivers and lakes at these locations.

Source: 2005 USGS data (most recent available data)

Conclusion:

The U.S. has water for almost every use including irrigating lawns, golf courses and ball parks while using the least amount of water to produce arguably one of our most important products for the success of our economy — reliable baseload electricity.

In most of Idaho, as in the rest of the U.S., without electricity, the economy would be devastated. So, it would seem water for power production should be a very high priority especially given the amount of electricity returned from large thermal plants. Specifically, less than 1% of the water leaving Idaho would cool a large dual unit nuclear power plant producing enough reliable power to address all foreseeable growth while stabilizing increasing power costs.

AEHI optimistic about upcoming decisions in Payette & Elmore Counties April 13, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, approval process, Colorado, Elmore County, Payette County, rural nuclear.
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PAYETTE, IDAHO: April 12, 2010, Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (OTCBB: AEHI) — Payette County Commissioners today delayed a decision on a comprehensive plan change until April 26th. The two weeks will give them enough time to discuss a few other potential changes that deal with bringing any kind of power producer into the county.

“This is good news for AEHI. While we would have hoped for a decision in our favor today, all the proposed improvements to the comprehensive plan involve changes that work very well for a nuclear power plant,” said Don Gillispie, AEHI CEO.

An overwhelming majority of Payette County residents have told commissioners in public hearings they want the plant, and more specifically the jobs and revenue a nuclear power plant will provide. Last year AEHI applied for a rezone of property near Hammett in Elmore County and was even permitted a series of public hearings on the application, but county commissioners never made a decision.

“They are now back to the table. While Elmore County Commissioners backtracked a little bit, they have accomplished a lot in very short amount of time. The Planning and Zoning Commission is about to move forward on a change to their comprehensive plan and once they do the county commissioners could approve it and immediately approve our rezone application since it’s already been through the public hearing process. I never thought I’d see Elmore County back in the game, but at this point they could surpass Payette County in the approval process by the end of the month,” said Gillispie.

The process has been of tremendous interest to the people of Idaho since the proposed plant is expected to increase the state’s GDP by $5 billion during construction, with $4.8 billion flowing directly through the county. Job numbers are equally impressive, as employment should jump by about 5,000 during construction and more than 1,000 during operation, with pay levels averaging $60,000 and $80,000 respectively.

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (http://www.alternateenergyholdings.com/) — Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources. The c ompany is the nation’s only independent nuclear power plant developer seeking to build new power plants in multiple non-nuclear states. Other projects include Energy Neutral™, which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (http://www.energyneutralinc.com/), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generation), and International Reactors, which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications. AEHI China, headquartered in Beijing, develops joint ventures to produce nuclear plant components and consults on nuclear power. AEHI Korea, Seoul, is assisting KEPCO (Korea Electric Power Corporation) to export their APR 1400 reactor into the US and achieve NRC design certification.

“Safe Harbor” Statement: This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate. As a result, investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. ###

Coal pollution levels increase April 8, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in China, coal power, environmentalists.
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The Environmental Integrity Project recently stated that coal-fired plants are the largest source of mercury pollution in the U.S., generating more than 40 percent of US emissions. Also, the mercury output had recently increased at more than half of the country’s 50 largest power plants. Mercury is a highly toxic metal and settles in lakes and rivers, where it moves up the food chain.

Coal has become an important part of the country’s energy mix and we get half of our electricity from it. Coal increased substantially in the 1980s, as paranoia and biased media coverage contributed to negative public perceptions of nuclear. Meanwhile, the environmental community did little to oppose coal, figuring it wasn’t as bad a nuclear. As it turns out, a 1,000 megawatt (MW) coal-fired power plant produces approximately the same amount of global warming as 1.2 million cars, around all the cars in Idaho.

Lately, though, the truth has been sinking in. In 2004, for example, U.S. coal plants made up 8 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions and are a significant source of radiation, heavy metals and CO2.

Natural gas doesn’t produce the toxics, but it still pumps out half the CO2 of coal and costs considerably more. Carbon capture holds promise but is still in the early stages and its economics are unknown.

You would think that coal would be on the way out (and it may be in the US), but China and India are planning hundreds of new coal plants. Pollution aside, coal has the advantages of being abundant, reliable, cheap and relatively easy to convert to electricity, so it is easy to see why it is of such interest in developing countries.

We think every form of electricity has a role to play within its limits and potential, including coal, providing its toxic and carbon pollution can be effectively dealt with. For our part, we are pleased more political leaders, environmentalists and members of the public are realizing the advantages of clean, plentiful and reliable nuclear. The nuclear renaissance is definitely here thanks to a more balanced and rational approach.

US public support for nuclear at record high April 2, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in Energy policy, public opinion, reprocessing.
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American public support for nuclear just keeps increasing. According to the World Nuclear News, US public support for nuclear energy has reached a record high, with 74% of people saying they are in favour of nuclear energy.

Surveys have shown a significant change in the US public’s view of nuclear energy over past years. In 1983, a Bisconti poll showed 49 percent of Americans supported nuclear.

The latest poll found 80 percent of  men and 68 percent of women favor nuclear. It also showed 33 percent strongly favored nuclear, more than triple the number who strongly oppose it. Some 87 percent of those questioned said they believe “nuclear energy will play an important role in meeting the nation’s electricity needs in the years ahead.”

In addition, 70 percent of respondents agreed the USA should “definitely build more nuclear power plants in the future”, compared with 28 percent who disagreed. The poll also showed high support for the US government  encouraging investment and 72 percent of those questioned said they backed government loan guarantees.

In addition, 82 percent said existing US nuclear power plants are “safe and secure” and some 79 percent  also said they would support a US plan to recycle used nuclear fuel rods in order to generate more electricity and reduce the amount of waste.

“This unprecedented support for nuclear energy is being driven largely by people’s concerns for meeting future energy demand and environmental goals, but it coincides with statements by President Barack Obama and other national leaders who have voiced strong support for new nuclear power plants,” said Ann Bisconti, president of Bisconti Research. “The President’s State of the Union speech and his subsequent announcement of federal loan guarantees for new nuclear reactors in Georgia clearly has elevated the issues in people’s minds.”

Last week, by the Gallup polling organization published a public opinion poll that also found a record high support for use of nuclear energy in the USA.

Another vote of support in Elmore County April 1, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, approval process, economic benefits, Elmore County, environmentalists, nuclear jobs.
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Elmore County P&Z votes to change comprehensive plan
AEHI plan to build nuclear power plant continues to move forward Mountain Home, Idaho

Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (AEHI:OB) – During a hearing Wednesday night, Elmore County Planning and Zoning Commissioners decided to recommend a change to the wording of the county’s comprehensive plan. The current plan requires industrial development to locate along Simco Road, which was a sticking point for a plan by Alternate Energy Holdings to build a nuclear power plant in another part of the county.

“This latest decision keeps the door open for a possible nuclear power plant in Elmore County and I believe it reflects the commissioners continued desire to keep our project in play. While AEHI’s Payette County site is currently the lead location in Idaho, we also welcome the news that Elmore County is taking such steps to increase the possibility for more economic development,” said Don Gillispie, AEHI CEO.

During the meeting a nuclear power opponent requested the commissioners change the wording of the comprehensive plan in a way that would close the door to a nuclear power plant, which the commissioners refused.

The planned changes include expanding light industrial into areas of city impact and expanding heavy industrial into areas that “will not be detrimental to neighboring and existing land uses”. Those changes will be signed April 21st, after which they will go before the Board of County Commissioners for final approval.

Nuclear power has been recognized as a vital method to increase econimic viability especially in rural communities like those proposed in Elmore and Payette counties. AEHI’s project is estimated to increase employment by more than 5,000 workers through construction, and more than 1,000 during operations. The commercial benefit during construction is even more impressive, increasing the state’s GDP by $5.8 billion, with $4.3 billion of that money filtering directly through the county.

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc.: (www.alternateenergyholdings.com) Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources. The company is the nation’s only publicly traded independent nuclear power plant developer willing to build power plants in non-nuclear states. Other projects include, Energy Neutral which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (www.energyneutralinc.com), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generation), and International Reactors, which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications. AEHI China, headquartered in Beijing, develops joint ventures to produce nuclear plant components and consults on nuclear power. AEHI Korea, Seoul, is helping negotiate with KEPCO.

“Safe Harbor” Statement: This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate. As a result, investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.