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Water usage and nuclear power plants April 23, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in nuclear industry, Water policy.
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Water usage and nuclear power plants is little known in the U.S., even in areas where water is at a premium such as in the semi-arid western states, where most of the fresh water is consumed in this country. Here are the facts:

  • About 80% is used for irrigation and much of that is for golf courses, lawns, parks, recreation fields, swimming pools and commercial property beautification. 2 billion gallons per day is used on golf courses alone.
  • Approximately 10% is used for industry and business.
  • About 7% is used for household use including some irrigation.
  • The remainder, around 3.0% is used for thermal power plants. Nuclear, coal, combined cycle gas, CSP solar and geothermal are thermal plants.  Coal plants are by far the largest user, followed by nuclear plants, and finally combined cycle gas plants in order of power production.

Figures from the above graph are very similar for Idaho except only about .01% of the fresh water is used for thermal power plants.

Note:
It is critical to point out just how much water leaves southern Idaho on an annual basis without ever being used.  In fact, 7,900,000 acre feet of water leaves the state every year via the Snake River, which has the Payette River as one of its tributaries
.

A proposed nuclear power plant in Payette County would use less than 1% of this water.

(Source: SPF Water Engineering)

What sources of electricity require the most water?

  • There are 2400 hydroelectric plants in the United States that require the largest amount of water than any other power producer.  However, hydro plants only produce 7% of the nation’s electricity and around 40% in Idaho, which is decreasing according to the Athena report. (http://www.harvestcleanenergy.org/IdahoEnergy/IdahoEnergyFuture_PR.pdf)  While there is some evaporation behind the dams, much of the water is held for production of often small amounts of power instead of flood control even when the water is needed in semi-arid climates for crop irrigation and industry.  There are no emissions with hydro, however, these plants negatively impact the environment in a variety of ways including fish passage and silting.
  • There are 600 coal plants in the U.S., which require more water than any other thermal power source due to the large number of units.  Coal produces 50% of the nation’s electricity, but they have the worst emissions of all power sources.  Many of these emissions contain mercury, sulfur and CO2.
  • There are 104 nuclear plants in the U.S. which use less water with fewer units than coal.  Nuclear power plants produce 20% of the nation’s electricity and 70% of all emission-free electricity.
  • Combine-cycle gas plants use the least amount of water of all the major power sources because they are the smallest power contributor.  However, these plants are rapidly growing in number and emit a large amount of CO2, although those emissions are about half the amount of an equivalent size coal plant.
  • Geothermal plants produce less than 1% of the nation’s power and use water much like any equivalent size thermal plant.  However, many of these plants have to inject water into the earth, which requires even more of this valuable resource.
  • Solar power plants, while contributing less than 1% of our electricity, use more water than thermal plants to wash the panels and for cooling of Concentrated Solar Power (CSP).
  • Almost all thermal power plants require about the same amount of water to cool a megawatt using conventional cooling methods.

Nuclear plant water usage:

There is a great deal of misinformation surrounding nuclear plant water usage often propagated by opponents of nuclear power. Water is recirculated for cooling of the power plant and it is consumed by the plant as well.  Here’s a look at the facts:

  • The power block in a steam-cycle plant, which actually produces the power, will consume between 50,000 to 100,000 gallons per day depending on the design and operations.
  • The workers at the plant will consume 500,000 to 700,000 gallons for day for toilets, cooking, washing and other general industrial usage.
  • AEHI’s design will use a hybrid cooling system that will control consumption depending on water availability to less than one million gallons per day or 1000 acre-feet per year (140 acres irrigated) for the steam cycle and plant usage (listed above) if required due to water shortage. This minimum consumptive mode is known as dry cooling.
  • Depending on the reactor’s total power and the cooling system design, the plant can recirculate up to 20 to 25 million gallons per day for cooling. In this cooling system, water is pumped from the water source (river) to fill ponds near the power plant.  It is then circulated from one pond into the plant for cooling, afterwards the water is returned to another pond to cool before being sent back to the first pond to use again. These ponds will be filled when water flow in the river is high.
  • Many older nuclear plants use high water consumptive cooling up to 90% of the recirculated water (such as cooling towers which are spray evaporative cooling) and were built where water was abundant from large rivers and lakes at these locations.

Source: 2005 USGS data (most recent available data)

Conclusion:

The U.S. has water for almost every use including irrigating lawns, golf courses and ball parks while using the least amount of water to produce arguably one of our most important products for the success of our economy — reliable baseload electricity.

In most of Idaho, as in the rest of the U.S., without electricity, the economy would be devastated. So, it would seem water for power production should be a very high priority especially given the amount of electricity returned from large thermal plants. Specifically, less than 1% of the water leaving Idaho would cool a large dual unit nuclear power plant producing enough reliable power to address all foreseeable growth while stabilizing increasing power costs.

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Hearing tonight on our Payette plans March 22, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, approval process, economic benefits, nuclear industry, nuclear jobs, Payette County.
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Payette County Commissioners to review P&Z findings
Any changes to affect AEHI plan to build nuclear power plant

Payette, Idaho: Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (AEHI:OB) – Payette County Commissioners will meet tonight (Monday, March 22nd) to discuss a potential change to the county’s comprehensive plan. They are expected to review findings from the Planning & Zoning Commission, which if approved would set the stage for the building of a proposed nuclear power plant near New Plymouth, Idaho.

The hearing will take place 7:00 PM at the Payette County Courthouse, located at 1130 3rd Ave. N., Payette.

Previous hearings have seen overwhelming support for AEHI. In fact nearly 80 percent of those attending at the last hearing spoke of their desire to have a nuclear power plant built in their county.

The proposal brings with it a large number of jobs and economic benefits. In fact, a recent study shows the project would create more than 5,000 jobs through the construction phase, and 3,000 plus jobs through the operational stage. It would also include an annual commercial impact of $3.58 billion to Idaho’s economy, which is a nearly seven-percent increase to Idaho’s GDP over 2009. In Payette County, the commercial impact is estimated at $3.43 billion, which is unprecedented in that part of Idaho.

Should AEHI receive the approval on the comprehensive plan change, the company would immediately process an application to rezone 5,000 acres in Payette County near Big Willow Road and Stone Quarry Road.

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc.: (www.alternateenergyholdings.com) Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources. The company is the nation’s only publicly traded independent nuclear power plant developer willing to build power plants in non-nuclear states. Other projects include, Energy Neutral which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (www.energyneutralinc.com), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generation), and International Reactors, which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications. AEHI China, headquartered in Beijing, develops joint ventures to produce nuclear plant components and consults on nuclear power. AEHI Korea, Seoul, is helping negotiate with KEPCO.

“Safe Harbor” Statement: This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate. As a result, investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

MidAmerican energy revisits nuclear, this time in Iowa March 12, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in Energy policy, nuclear industry, Payette County, Warren Buffet.
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As many people know, Warren Buffet’s MidAmerican Energy proposed building a nuclear power plant in Payette County in 2007 and did some preliminary studies (they were considering a different site than we are in Payette). But the company announced in December 2007 that it wasn’t moving forward, saying the decision was “based on economic considerations and not on issues related to the suitability of the Idaho site.”

Apparently, MidAmerican has found some new sources of funding and is considering building a nuclear plant in Iowa. The state senate there has voted to allow MidAmerican to increase electric consumer rates to fund a three-year, $15 million feasibility study of what would be Iowa’s second nuclear plant, according to World Nuclear News. This will amount to a $4 per year increase in residential customers’ electricity bills, with a $15 increase for commercial customers and $1100 for industrial customers.

I certainly understand the need for this kind of study. In fact, we have spent around $10 million conducting similar studies in Owyhee, Elmore and Payette counties. What’s most noteworthy, however, is that no Idaho utility ratepayer has given us a dime – nor should they.

While our critics call us a “merchant power plant” (presumably merchant farmers, merchant computer chip makers and merchants in general are okay), we are a completely investor-funded operation. We will fund studies, applications and construction of our plant on the private market, without having to ask government bodies for rate increases. In the best tradition of private enterprise, it will be up to us to find a way to make it pencil out financially and recoup our investment in the free market.

Nuclear critics took Buffet’s 2007 withdrawal from Idaho as a sign that a nuclear plant cannot be profitable (although it is hard to imagine them applauding a profitable nuclear plant), but they were wrong then and they are more obviously wrong now. I know from experience that nuclear plants are very profitable, generating as much as $3 million a day in profit. While they have high initial capital costs, uranium is inexpensive and the plants last for decades. Warren Buffet must know this as well.

Developing a nuclear plant requires extensive study and we wish MidAmerican the best in their venture. We have charted a course, however, that will not require any utility payers to subsidize our costs, and that’s a good thing for Idaho.

How AEHI can afford to build a nuclear power plant January 21, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, economic benefits, Investment news, nuclear industry, nuclear jobs, Payette County.
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Lately we’ve had a lot of questions about how AEHI plans to fund a nuclear power plant.  There have been a lot of rumors floating around about the process, so we’d like to use the following opinion piece to clear up any misconceptions. Dan Hamilton, AEHI director of public relations, wrote the following opinion.

As a child, and not unlike other kids, I was often relentless in questioning my parents menial issues, “Why do I need to eat all my food, why can’t I stay up, and why can’t I spend the night on the roof?”

Most parents know what I’m talking about.

Meaningful answers were often provided, but later the answer to all these questions became, “Because I said so.” An irritating response, but now it’s one I use on my own children, because thinking of a real answer takes time to formulate in a way they’ll understand.

I thought a lot about that lately, and as a representative of Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc., I think responses to , “How can your company afford to build a nuclear power plant”, have begun sounding like a tired parent saying, “Because I said so.”

The real answer is much more complicated.

Depending on the reactor, the finished project, likely on a 5,000 acre piece of property outside Payette, will cost between $5 billion and $8 billion.

This is an investor-driven operation, at least in the beginning, and paying for it will require a couple different methods, or phases. These are the reasons investors continue supporting AEHI, because they’ve learned there is no downside to investing in a nuclear power plant.
Phase one will require about $100 million to pay for land, water, engineers, lawyers and applications. Last summer AEHI announced an agreement with an investment group to fund $70 million worth of the project and now we have several large international investors also interested.

Phase two takes place after AEHI receives local and federal approval; once approved, the property will increase in value to about $1.5 billion. The land then becomes an asset used to borrow $5 billion to $8 billion for construction. No loan payments are expected until the plant is operational, and once running at full capacity, it will create about $3 billion annually in reliable profits for 60 years.

These projections create a very attractive loan for most lenders.
Making this even more attractive, and much less risky, is a federal loan guarantee, which insures loan repayment up to 80 percent its original value. You can read more about this program on the Nuclear Energy Institute’s website: http://tinyurl.com/financingnuclearpower. This is also a program many senators are trying to expand.

In short, after phase one, AEHI will have a $1.5 billion asset and a nearly $10 billion asset after phase two — in either case, a very profitable proposition.

It’s also profitable for state and local economies. Following local approval, Phase one will create hundreds of jobs and contribute millions. After federal approval, Phase two will create billions of dollars in gross domestic product every year and thousands of jobs through construction and operation. Then there are local businesses needed to support the people working at the plant.

When finished, about 500 people will be needed to operate the plant, with pay averaging about $80,000 a year.

Coming from someone who studied these issues in great detail as a reporter, who quickly became a proponent, and now as an employee of AEHI, I have learned this project can be accomplished and has the potential to become hugely successful.

I hope you will take the time to study the matter for yourself. You will likely come to the same conclusion. This plant is crucial to providing Idaho with the revenue, the jobs, and the essential base load power the state needs for years to come.

Progress in China December 15, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in Agriculture, China, Chinese nuclear energy, nuclear industry, Water policy.
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Press Release 11:40 AM EDT

AEHI begins development of a joint venture using a large nuclear reactor for desalination of sea water into potable water and electricity production

Beijing, China, December 15, 2009 – Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (OTC: AEHI.PK): AEHI China has recently signed an agreement to cooperate in the develop of a joint venture with the Nuclear Power Institute of China to design, manufacture and market world-wide a 1000 MWe  reactor with the ability to produce potable water from sea water or unsuitable fresh water and electricity. The new reactor-desalting unit will be very competively price in the world market. An AEHI holding, International Reactors Inc, hopes to be able to start accepting orders in 2010.

Don Gillispie, AEHI Chairman and CEO, said, “Two of mankind’s biggest challenges today are obtaining adequate fresh water and low cost, reliable, clean electricity. The world demand for fresh water will outstrip supply in about 15 years by 50% due to drought, population growth and industrial demand.  We believe this reactor-desalting unit can uniquely produce the much needed water and electricity to pump it far inland where needed without creating pollution from fossil fuels.”

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (www.alternateenergyholdings.com)

Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources. The company is the nation’s only publicly traded independent nuclear power plant developer willing to build power plants in non-nuclear states. Other projects include, Energy Neutral which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (www.energyneutralinc.com), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generation), and International Reactors, which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications. Also, AEHI China, headquartered in Beijing, develops joint ventures to produce nuclear plant components and consults on nuclear power.

Safe Harbor” Statement: This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate. As a result, investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

US Investor Relations:

208-939-9311

invest@aehipower.com

Local approval of nuclear plant rezone could lead to as many as 100 short-term jobs this coming spring, according to company November 23, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, approval process, errata, nuclear industry, nuclear jobs, Payette County, rural nuclear.
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[The first version of this news release erroneously stated the county where people may send supportive testimony for the Payette County nuclear plant; this error has been corrected in the version below]

Local approval of nuclear plant rezone could lead to as many as 100 short-term jobs this coming spring, according to company
Testimony ran 2-to1 in favor of plant at last week’s public hearing

Nov. 23, 2009

For more information:

Don Gillispie, 209-939-9311

http://aehipower.com

http://facebook.com/aehipower

http://twitter.com/aehi

Testimony for a proposed nuclear plant at a hearing last week was 2 to 1 in favor and the company says it may start hiring a few dozen people locally as early as next spring, assuming the county rezones the land.

“Discounting the usual anti-nuclear group speakers from around the state – who have no vested interest in Payette’s land use – the ratio was closer to 3 to 1 in favor,” said Don Gillispie, CEO of Alternate Energy Holdings Inc.

Gillispie said preliminary site assessment will create an immediate need for drillers, surveyors, earth movers, contractors, laborers and other well-paying jobs.

“Our proposed power plant will put thousands of people to work when construction hits full stride, but preliminary site assessment this spring may start employing workers in the short-term,” Gillispie said. “According to economic projections, the project will create 4,000 to 5,000 jobs during the construction phase, which could start as soon as 2013.”

However, a limited amount of work will need to take place this spring for site study. For example, a meteorological tower and some simple outbuildings will need to be constructed and some grading done. Well drillers will be hired to take core samples and surveyors to stake out preliminary locations. Basic electrical service will also be brought to the site, requiring electricians.

All of this work will be in preparation for an application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Gillispie hopes to make an initial NRC application in the spring of 2011 (the company must collect a least a year’s worth of meteorological data).

Gillispie said these jobs heavily depend on local approval of the comprehensive plan amendment and rezoning of the land, as these will unlock additional investment. He encouraged people to send resumes and letters of interest to info@aehipower.com and to send supportive testimony to Payette County at lroyston@payettecounty.org pr imachuca@payettecounty.org prior to the Dec. 10 deadline. AEHI also expects to have an informational video up on its Web site www.aehipower.com by Tuesday.

“We have lots of investors, including large institutional investors, who are watching the approval process closely,” Gillispie said. “Naturally, they are seeing if we can at least make it over the first hurdle before they consider loaning money for site prep work.”

AEHI considered building a plant in Owyhee County in 2007 and early 2008, until discovery of a geological fault stopped the project. With no other suitable sites in Owyhee County, the company turned its efforts to Elmore County, where the rezone request has been delayed for over a year with no vote on the application. Nevertheless, the company has spent a total of $10 million in these two counties to date – and most of the money was spent in Idaho, creating the equivalent of approximately 200 jobs.

“The closer companies and contractors are to Payette County, the more employment priority we will give them, and those located in the county will get highest priority of all,” Gillispie said. “We will also be going through a stack of hundreds of resumes we have collected from people at a jobs booth in April, and resumes and letters of interest people have sent us over the years.”

AEHI has filed to amend the Payette County comprehensive plan and rezone some 500 acres of a 5,100 acre parcel; the remaining 4,600 acres will remain ag and serve as a buffer.

At a hearing last week before the county planning and zoning commission, about two dozen Payette County and Idaho residents said the plant is needed to bring safe, secure employment and clean industry to the county. The P and Z commission will discuss the issue on Thursday, Dec. 10 and are expected to make a recommendation to the Payette County Commission on that date.

The county commission will hold another hearing and vote on the rezone, possibly by year’s end. Rezone approval will then allow pre-COLA (Nuclear Regulatory Commission Application) preparations to begin in the first quarter of 2010.

“As current national polls show 75 percent of Americans support new nuclear power plants, communities are openly inviting nuclear developers to consider their location as a potential site,” Gillispie said. “It is certainly refreshing to see this change, but not surprising considering the extensive benefits of these plants. It is apparent our new Idaho county is up to the competitive challenge in processing our application in a timely fashion.”

The nuclear industry is already putting people to work. According to the Nuclear Energy Institute, “nuclear energy is one of the few bright spots in the US economy – expanding rather than contracting.” An NEI report says the prospect of new plant construction in has already stimulated considerable investment and job creation among companies that supply the nuclear industry:  “Over the last several years, the nuclear industry has invested over $4 billion in new nuclear plant development and plans to invest approximately $8 billion in the next several years to be in a position to start construction in 2011-2012.” In the course of this, NEI said, “private investment in new nuclear power plants has created an estimated 14,000-15,000 jobs.” The number of new jobs “will expand dramatically after 2011 when the first wave of these new nuclear projects starts construction.”

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (www.alternateenergyholdings.com)

Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources. The company is the nation’s only publicly traded independent nuclear power plant developer willing to build power plants in non-nuclear states. Other projects include, Energy Neutral which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (www.energyneutralinc.com), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generation), and International Reactors, which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications. Also, AEHI China, headquartered in Beijing, develops joint ventures to produce nuclear plant components and consults on nuclear power.

“Safe Harbor” Statement: This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate.

 

Promising signs from Korea September 23, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, Colorado, Energy policy, Korean reactors, nuclear industry, reactor types.
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I am currently travelling in Colorado but I wanted to update followers on some initiatives we have going. Alternate Energy Holdings Inc. is nearing a deal to bring the first Korean advanced reactor to the US for the Idaho nuclear project. This is an excellent design based on Combustion Engineering and Westinghouse designs first developed in the US. Also, the Koreans are some of best reactor operators in the world. This reactor will allow AEHI to produce the lowest cost power of any proposed US power plant including combined cycle gas, wind, solar, geothermal and clean coal. It will also stimulate investment money from Korea into our Idaho nuclear project.  The MOU will be publicly announced in the near future.

Letter to investors September 11, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, China, Chinese nuclear energy, economic benefits, Elmore County, international, Investment news, nuclear industry.
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I sent a letter to investors recently. Keeping people informed about our company, its goals and status is an important to us.

September 9, 2009

Dear AEHI Stockholder,

First, let me thank you so much for your investment in AEHI. The company has several nuclear projects underway including our lead site in Idaho, as well as Colorado, a desalination reactor in Mexico and a Tar Sands reactor in Canada to remove trapped oil.

We also formed Energy Neutral, Inc last year to install wind, solar and geothermal heat pumps on homes and offices to eliminate energy bills. Currently, we plan to build our first energy free model home starting the first of October to demonstrate we can construct buildings with no power bills at essentially the same price as those with energy bills. This will help launch our first energy neutral subdivision. The Energy Neutral Trade Mark name is pending as well.

The Idaho reactor, Idaho Energy Complex, is in the process of seeking local approval and we expect it by year’s end. After the Elmore County site approval was delayed due to process problems, we began looking at other sites and now have three additional Idaho counties who are extremely interested in having our plant. A little competition is always healthy. In addition, we are reviewing state lands for potential sites. After two years of educating Idaho citizens along with support from the national media and key state leaders, we have no doubt that an approved site will happen in Idaho soon and we will be adding staff locally to accommodate. We have a funding commitment from Source Capital for the site.

In July, we opened an office in Beijing, China with some investors as AEHI China to facilitate joint ventures for nuclear components among other things and large institutional investors. With the support of the Chinese government nuclear officials, we have several companies who are interested in working with us. I now travel to China every couple of months to facilitate these deals. Also, we are in the process of negotiating on the price to bring the Korean advanced reactor, APR 1400, to the US. This reactor will be lower than the cost of the other reactors currently in the US market making us more than competitive with any new source of electricity in the country. As a backup, we have begun to talk with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries about their advanced reactor as well. Further, we have a large energy trust that is willing to loan us up to $5 billion for the plant construction phase.

Lastly, in lieu of going on the London Plus Exchange as mentioned in my last letter, we are starting the process for our first public stock offering (IPO) for later this year and a move to the American Stock Exchange. This will open the stock up to institutional and more international investors by the first quarter of 2010 allowing us to leave the penny stock category.

As you can see there is plenty of positive news in the making, we will publicly announce this information as it unfolds. If you would like some more AEHI stock or have qualified investor friends, the price is at its lowest from the company at 5 cents per share with no broker fee or volume limit like in the market. This offer will end October 31 when we file for our public offering. We doubt this price will ever be available again. Also, if you have an unrestricted investment 401K or any IRA you can transfer funds to AEHI stock as well.

Just send an e-mail to invest@aehipower.com or call 208-939-9311for more information and PPM, or you can just mail a check to AEHI if an existing investor. If you are an investor you can add to your holdings for as little as $1000 or any amount above that minimum. New investors need to review the PPM.

Again, thanks for your support as we try to help the country with jobs and clean, low cost energy that will also assist us with energy independence.

Best regards,

Don Gillispie

Expanding opportunities August 6, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, Elmore County, Energy policy, nuclear industry, Politics and nuclear.
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Anyone who knows me, knows I am not a complacent person. While our application in Elmore County remains in play as much as ever, it has been a year and we have no clear commitment from the county. Our duty to our stockholders, to our principles and to the people of Idaho requires us to move forward with consideration of other sites.

NEWS RELEASE

For 9:15 am

August 6, 2009

AEHI’s Idaho Nuclear Plant Offered Multiple Sites

Boise, Idaho, August 6, 2009 – Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (OTC: AEHI.PK): AEHI is pleased  to announce several Idaho counties and the state have recently offered lands for AEHI’s nuclear plant following delays in local approval at the current site in Elmore County.

AEHI CEO and president Don Gillispie said, “It is certainly exciting to have so many in Idaho recognize the tremendous benefits of a next generation, environmentally friendly nuclear plant including high paying jobs, great tax revenue; and abundant, low cost, clean power in a region that is critically short on base load energy options. Elmore County’s delay has created a friendly competition for our plant. We are now looking at two additional sites outside of the current county that may actually receive local approval before the existing site.”

AEHI’s site engineering contractor is completing their assessments so we can move forward in a timely manner on these new nuclear plant locations.

Also, the company has also been in contact with several non-nuclear utilities who are considering nuclear plants instead of continuing to invest in the rising cost of carbon plants going forward and need nuclear experienced partners.

“This is likely to be an increasing trend as primarily fossil based utilities realize nuclear is the only viable option for clean base load power today. While nuclear prices are affordable and stable, fossil-fuel prices continue to rise dramatically and fewer carbon base load plants negatively impacts reliability for their customers,” says Gillispie.

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (www.alternateenergyholdings.com)

Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources.  Current projects include the Idaho Energy Complex (an advanced nuclear plant and bio-fuel generation facility), Energy Neutral which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (www.energyneutralinc.com), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generating plants) and International Reactors, Inc., which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications.

This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby.  Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate.

US Investor Relations:

208-939-9311

invest@aehipower.com

About Elmore County’s Comprehensive Plan June 9, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, Agriculture, approval process, economic benefits, Elmore County, nuclear industry, rural nuclear, Snake River Alliance, Solar energy, Wind energy.
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(We submitted this opinion to the Mountain Home News today for publication tomorrow.)

The Elmore County Commission said some surprising things Monday. Since they can’t hear any more testimony, it is likely my words won’t make it to them. But it would be helpful, whether or not this project succeeds, to clarify a few things.

The Commissioners correctly pointed out on several occasions the comprehensive plan appears to conflict with itself. That is to be expected in a complex effort like land use planning, but it doesn’t have to be that way. As I will talk about, our rezone proposal actually does conform to the comprehensive plan because our development would provide steady, well-paying jobs; will greatly improve the local tax base; won’t threaten the rural way of life so important to Elmore County residents; and we have addressed concerns about possible future misuse of the land.

The Commission asked their attorney for an opinion as to whether or not they can restrict future uses of the land. The Commissioners are concerned that if they rezone the land for industrial use and the nuclear plant isn’t developed, the landowner could apply to build some undesirable use and the commission would have little ability to stop it.

This is a reasonable concern. However, we addressed it early on in the process. Along with our application, we submitted a development agreement. The agreement makes clear that if we do not build a nuclear power plant on the land, then it must revert to agricultural zoning.

Elected officials are understandably reluctant to deviate from their comprehensive plans. However, they also know there will come times to make reasonable exceptions. We believe this is such a time. The current comprehensive plan, however well-intentioned, did not foresee the possibility of an ambitious and economically significant proposal such as ours, the most expensive single piece of private infrastructure ever proposed for Idaho.

The designated industrial location, Simco Road, has very little water; a 20-mile-long pipe would need to be constructed, presenting insurmountable safety and right-of-way concerns. The site has geologic issues that also make it difficult to site a nuclear plant there. Interestingly, much more intrusive uses, such as industrial wind farms and natural gas plants, may be located anywhere in the county without a heavy industrial designation. This is especially puzzling, as a nuclear plant emits no smoke, noise, dust or odors and takes up very little space.

Another commissioner said the people of Hammett have spoken overwhelmingly against the rezone. While many Hammett-area farmers spoke as individuals (and included their feelings again as members of a group), that is by no means representative of Hammett the town, where many of the workers on these farms actually live.

Of the 1,600 signatures we gathered in favor of the rezone (half from Elmore County), we estimate at least 50 came from in and around Hammett, where our community organizing efforts found people, many of them agricultural workers, desperate for stable, well-paying jobs. These figures suggest national polls about nuclear power, which routinely show 70%-plus support.

One of the commissioners’ least enviable jobs is to balance competing interests, each of them important. Should they (as our opponents say) approve an industry that would destroy the rural way of life? Or should they adopt a clean, stable source of energy and the jobs that go with it? Unfortunately, our opponents have presented this as an either-or choice when, in fact, it is not. In terms of being an industrial use, we will no more impose upon Elmore County’s rural way of life than a cheese plant or an air force base (which we whole heartedly support as a veteran run organization).

If the farmers could demonstrate the plant we propose would harm their way of life, they might have a case for keeping hundreds of their fellow county residents from holding power plant jobs. As it stands, however, nuclear plants are excellent neighbors. Of the 1,300 acres proposed in our rezone, about 200 would be for the actual plant. The remaining land would consist of ponds and farms, as is common in the predominantly rural settings where nuclear plants are located. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, it costs 1.8 cents to produce a kilowatt-hour of electricity with nuclear power, and that power is produced more than 90 percent of the time (http://tinyurl.com/2pgc8k). That’s a significant benefit to farmers

Indeed, Elmore County farms have for decades abutted extremely intensive heavy-industrial uses with no problems. I’m speaking of Mountain Home Air Force Base, Despite the general mistrust of government in our society, the Air Force Base has been a good neighbor and is a pillar of the region’s economy. Safe to say, MHAFB would have a hard time fitting in the Simco Road location.

One commissioner also expressed concern about how construction would affect local services. Any sort of significant project will certainly impose some burdens and we have suggested ways to address them. Ideas include paying money directly to the county to reduce the bill for all taxpayers as compensation for disruption; job training; a community center; scholarships; direct infrastructure funding; and a committee to oversee service needs (for details, see my open letter to the people of Hammett on my blog at www.cleanidahoenergy.wordpress.com). Not to mention, these burdens would pale in comparison to the benefits specified in the next paragraph.

Current farms in Elmore County produce 2.86 jobs (some seasonal) per acre, or about 4 jobs at the current location. Our plant would produce 500-year round jobs at the site and 5,000 peak jobs per year during construction; $558 million in local payroll and labor income; and $205 million in local ripple payroll income. The plant would also create an additional 1,754 full-time support jobs and massive improvements in schools, police, fire and other infrastructure funding.

The irony isn’t lost on me that the commission these days is also holding meetings on how to deal with a pressing budget crisis. Our proposal would start putting people to work immediately and increase the economic security for the all residents of Elmore County.

One of the Commissioners made another important statement. If Elmore County residents – and presumably the Snake River Alliance – wish to see farmland kept undeveloped, they should probably consider forming a land trust or other legal vehicle to accomplish it. To restrict private property rights for that reason is not a wise use of power.

Things are going well for AEHI. Last week, we signed an agreement with Source Capital Group Inc. to raise money for the project. The funds will cover land, water rights and engineering services to obtain Nuclear Regulatory Commission approval to construct and operate an advanced nuclear plant in Elmore County, Idaho, estimated to total some $70 million. Every company that has undertaken the NRC application process has successfully completed it and received a construction/operation license.

We see a bright future for Elmore County, one that many communities in America share. It is a future of economic security and low-cost energy, with a nuclear plant quietly, cleanly and dependably powering its farms, homes and businesses. We hope the Elmore County Commission votes for this future and approves our rezone.