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AEHI optimistic about upcoming decisions in Payette & Elmore Counties April 13, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, approval process, Colorado, Elmore County, Payette County, rural nuclear.
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PAYETTE, IDAHO: April 12, 2010, Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (OTCBB: AEHI) — Payette County Commissioners today delayed a decision on a comprehensive plan change until April 26th. The two weeks will give them enough time to discuss a few other potential changes that deal with bringing any kind of power producer into the county.

“This is good news for AEHI. While we would have hoped for a decision in our favor today, all the proposed improvements to the comprehensive plan involve changes that work very well for a nuclear power plant,” said Don Gillispie, AEHI CEO.

An overwhelming majority of Payette County residents have told commissioners in public hearings they want the plant, and more specifically the jobs and revenue a nuclear power plant will provide. Last year AEHI applied for a rezone of property near Hammett in Elmore County and was even permitted a series of public hearings on the application, but county commissioners never made a decision.

“They are now back to the table. While Elmore County Commissioners backtracked a little bit, they have accomplished a lot in very short amount of time. The Planning and Zoning Commission is about to move forward on a change to their comprehensive plan and once they do the county commissioners could approve it and immediately approve our rezone application since it’s already been through the public hearing process. I never thought I’d see Elmore County back in the game, but at this point they could surpass Payette County in the approval process by the end of the month,” said Gillispie.

The process has been of tremendous interest to the people of Idaho since the proposed plant is expected to increase the state’s GDP by $5 billion during construction, with $4.8 billion flowing directly through the county. Job numbers are equally impressive, as employment should jump by about 5,000 during construction and more than 1,000 during operation, with pay levels averaging $60,000 and $80,000 respectively.

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (http://www.alternateenergyholdings.com/) — Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources. The c ompany is the nation’s only independent nuclear power plant developer seeking to build new power plants in multiple non-nuclear states. Other projects include Energy Neutral™, which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (http://www.energyneutralinc.com/), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generation), and International Reactors, which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications. AEHI China, headquartered in Beijing, develops joint ventures to produce nuclear plant components and consults on nuclear power. AEHI Korea, Seoul, is assisting KEPCO (Korea Electric Power Corporation) to export their APR 1400 reactor into the US and achieve NRC design certification.

“Safe Harbor” Statement: This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate. As a result, investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. ###

Another vote of support in Elmore County April 1, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, approval process, economic benefits, Elmore County, environmentalists, nuclear jobs.
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Elmore County P&Z votes to change comprehensive plan
AEHI plan to build nuclear power plant continues to move forward Mountain Home, Idaho

Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (AEHI:OB) – During a hearing Wednesday night, Elmore County Planning and Zoning Commissioners decided to recommend a change to the wording of the county’s comprehensive plan. The current plan requires industrial development to locate along Simco Road, which was a sticking point for a plan by Alternate Energy Holdings to build a nuclear power plant in another part of the county.

“This latest decision keeps the door open for a possible nuclear power plant in Elmore County and I believe it reflects the commissioners continued desire to keep our project in play. While AEHI’s Payette County site is currently the lead location in Idaho, we also welcome the news that Elmore County is taking such steps to increase the possibility for more economic development,” said Don Gillispie, AEHI CEO.

During the meeting a nuclear power opponent requested the commissioners change the wording of the comprehensive plan in a way that would close the door to a nuclear power plant, which the commissioners refused.

The planned changes include expanding light industrial into areas of city impact and expanding heavy industrial into areas that “will not be detrimental to neighboring and existing land uses”. Those changes will be signed April 21st, after which they will go before the Board of County Commissioners for final approval.

Nuclear power has been recognized as a vital method to increase econimic viability especially in rural communities like those proposed in Elmore and Payette counties. AEHI’s project is estimated to increase employment by more than 5,000 workers through construction, and more than 1,000 during operations. The commercial benefit during construction is even more impressive, increasing the state’s GDP by $5.8 billion, with $4.3 billion of that money filtering directly through the county.

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc.: (www.alternateenergyholdings.com) Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources. The company is the nation’s only publicly traded independent nuclear power plant developer willing to build power plants in non-nuclear states. Other projects include, Energy Neutral which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (www.energyneutralinc.com), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generation), and International Reactors, which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications. AEHI China, headquartered in Beijing, develops joint ventures to produce nuclear plant components and consults on nuclear power. AEHI Korea, Seoul, is helping negotiate with KEPCO.

“Safe Harbor” Statement: This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate. As a result, investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

AEHI’s second Idaho nuclear site gets boost from Elmore County P&Z January 25, 2010

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, approval process, Elmore County.
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Eagle, Idaho, January 25, 2010 – Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (OTCBB: AEHI.OB): Elmore County Planning and Zoning Commissioners agreed to change the county’s comprehensive plan supporting AEHI’s proposed nuclear plant.

Commissioners agreed with AEHI and said other parts of the county should be available for heavy industrial development, which will help clear the way for a nuclear power plant near Hammett, Idaho.

According to the Mountain Home News, one of the new P&Z commissioners noted this process has taken far too long, nearly 24 months, about 75 percent longer than other Idaho counties.  It’s the same reason AEHI began looking at other counties several months ago.

Since then the company cleared a similar hurdle January 14th, when Payette County P&Z Commissioners voted to change their comprehensive plan in favor of a nuclear power plant.

“The process now comes down to the question of timely site approval as our stockholders and financial institutions are anxious to break ground on the Idaho project.  We’ve seen a huge outpouring of support from people living in both areas and believe these recent decisions confirm that support,” said AEHI Chairman and CEO Don Gillispie.

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (www.alternateenergyholdings.com) Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources. The company is the nation’s only publicly traded independent nuclear power plant developer willing to build power plants in non-nuclear states. Other projects include, Energy Neutral which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (www.energyneutralinc.com), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generation), and International Reactors, which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications. AEHI China, headquartered in Beijing, develops joint ventures to produce nuclear plant components and consults on nuclear power. AEHI Korea, Seoul, is helping negotiate with KEPCO and seek large investors for its projects.

“Safe Harbor” Statement: This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate. As a result, investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

Dan Hamilton
Director of Public Relations Alternate Energy Holding Inc. (AEHI)
911 E Winding Creek Drive, Suite 150
Eagle, ID 83616
work: 208-939-9311
cell: 208-914-8894
fax: 208-939-9260
email: dan@aehipower.com

Investment contacts:
invest@aehipower.com

208-939-9311

AEHI’s second Idaho nuclear site gets boost from Elmore County P&Z

Eagle, Idaho, January 25, 2010 – Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (OTCBB: AEHI.OB): Elmore County Planning and Zoning Commissioners agreed to change the county’s comprehensive plan supporting AEHI’s proposed nuclear plant.

Commissioners agreed with AEHI and said other parts of the county should be available for heavy industrial development, which will help clear the way for a nuclear power plant near Hammett, Idaho.

According to the Mountain Home News, one of the new P&Z commissioners noted this process has taken far too long, nearly 24 months, about 75 percent longer than other Idaho counties.  It’s the same reason AEHI began looking at other counties several months ago.

Since then the company cleared a similar hurdle January 14th, when Payette County P&Z Commissioners voted to change their comprehensive plan in favor of a nuclear power plant.

“The process now comes down to the question of timely site approval as our stockholders and financial institutions are anxious to break ground on the Idaho project.  We’ve seen a huge outpouring of support from people living in both areas and believe these recent decisions confirm that support,” said AEHI Chairman and CEO Don Gillispie.

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (www.alternateenergyholdings.com) Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources. The company is the nation’s only publicly traded independent nuclear power plant developer willing to build power plants in non-nuclear states. Other projects include, Energy Neutral which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (www.energyneutralinc.com), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generation), and International Reactors, which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications. AEHI China, headquartered in Beijing, develops joint ventures to produce nuclear plant components and consults on nuclear power. AEHI Korea, Seoul, is helping negotiate with KEPCO and seek large investors for its projects.

“Safe Harbor” Statement: This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate. As a result, investors should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

Thanks to the Payette Chamber of Commerce December 28, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in Elmore County, Payette County.
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Chambers of commerce are great organizations. Nuclear plants, like any large employer, rely on a vital and active business community to trade with locally and chambers have an important role to play. We are pleased to join the Payette Chamber and they were very kind to mention us in their recent newsletter (an edited version is below). In addition to the $1,000 we donated to WICAP, we gave $2500 to Operation Warm Heart this year in Elmore County, bought clothes for teen boy in need, gave cash to family whose house burned and I am sure I forgot some others.

From: Payette Chamber of Commerce [mailto:info@payettechamber.com]
Sent: Tuesday, December 22, 2009 3:37 PM
To: Undisclosed-Recipient:;
Subject: New members…donations delivered!

Hello Everyone!

First, I would like to thank Idaho Power Co. for joining our Sustaining Member roster today! Mike, you’re wonderful…thanks for all you do! (smiling..) YAY! I have appealed to several businesses to consider being sustaining members and if YOU are thinking about it, please call and talk to me if you have any questions!

I would also like to welcome a new chamber member today! AEHI (Alternate Energy Holdings Inc) is your Chambers newest member! Thank you for joining  AEHI and we welcome you into our membership! Their Chairman and CEO, Mr. Don Gillespie, will be our speaker at the July 2010 General luncheon meeting and we look forward to hearing more about the nuclear power facility seeking a home in Payette County! Please go to their website at http://www.alternateenergyholdings.com/ and learn more about nuclear energy. There is an interesting video at the bottom of their homepage that you can view which features Mr. Gillespie, our own Mike Hanigan, VFW Cmmdr. Denny Croner, and Fruitland Mayor Ken Bishop.

If any of you have flyers, news or events that you would like to have mentioned or inserted into the January electronic newsletter…the deadline for that will be Tuesday December 29th. REMEMBER IT’S STILL FREE TO MEMBERS…:)

This morning was wonderful for your chamber director (smiling)…I so enjoy giving at Christmas and I was blessed to able to help Albertson’s deliver your Turkey dinners this morning to WICAP~! I have posted the pictures on our website in the album titled “Christmas 2009 Turkey Bucks” and I will attach a group picture here of those who were there. (wow, I just noticed I had the exact same clothes on in the Thanksgiving picture delivering turkeys to WICAP…lol…they are going to think I have no other clothes! ..chuckling)..Anyway, it was truly a joyful experience to help deliver those 63 dinners this morning! Thank you all so very much!!

Another wonderful thing happended today…when I got back to the office, I had an email from Don Gillispie (of AEHI) who had not received my emails about the turkey bucks drive (since he wasn’t a member yet) but had had yesterdays results of the drive email forwarded to him (by Denny Croner) to let him know about it…and about the chambers involvement in it. Don Gillispie wanted to know how he could donate $1000.00 for the cause! I had to tell him that the drive was over, but I did talk with Alan Deardorff (of WICAP) who said that they are in need of cash now (the food needs, toys needs and clothing needs had been met) for families who are in emminent danger of having their heat, lights and water turned off. So Mr. Gillespie has made his donation directly to WICAP in the form of cash to help meet those needs also. I swear (tears up) we live in a wonderful world…and angels DO walk among us!!

Thank you to everyone who has helped us this Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday season to bring cheer, warmth and sustainance to those less fortunate than ourselves…thank you to those who haven’t helped but who spent a quiet moment wishing they could have (I am personally among this group)…and may God bless those who are receiving your generous donations today that they might have a truly blessed Christmas!

MERRY CHRISTMAS ….from me to you….and from your Chamber to your businesses

Shelley Breidenbach
Executive Director
Payette Chamber of Commerce

Local approval of nuclear plant rezone could lead to as many as 100 short-term jobs this coming spring, according to company November 23, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, approval process, errata, nuclear industry, nuclear jobs, Payette County, rural nuclear.
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[The first version of this news release erroneously stated the county where people may send supportive testimony for the Payette County nuclear plant; this error has been corrected in the version below]

Local approval of nuclear plant rezone could lead to as many as 100 short-term jobs this coming spring, according to company
Testimony ran 2-to1 in favor of plant at last week’s public hearing

Nov. 23, 2009

For more information:

Don Gillispie, 209-939-9311

http://aehipower.com

http://facebook.com/aehipower

http://twitter.com/aehi

Testimony for a proposed nuclear plant at a hearing last week was 2 to 1 in favor and the company says it may start hiring a few dozen people locally as early as next spring, assuming the county rezones the land.

“Discounting the usual anti-nuclear group speakers from around the state – who have no vested interest in Payette’s land use – the ratio was closer to 3 to 1 in favor,” said Don Gillispie, CEO of Alternate Energy Holdings Inc.

Gillispie said preliminary site assessment will create an immediate need for drillers, surveyors, earth movers, contractors, laborers and other well-paying jobs.

“Our proposed power plant will put thousands of people to work when construction hits full stride, but preliminary site assessment this spring may start employing workers in the short-term,” Gillispie said. “According to economic projections, the project will create 4,000 to 5,000 jobs during the construction phase, which could start as soon as 2013.”

However, a limited amount of work will need to take place this spring for site study. For example, a meteorological tower and some simple outbuildings will need to be constructed and some grading done. Well drillers will be hired to take core samples and surveyors to stake out preliminary locations. Basic electrical service will also be brought to the site, requiring electricians.

All of this work will be in preparation for an application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Gillispie hopes to make an initial NRC application in the spring of 2011 (the company must collect a least a year’s worth of meteorological data).

Gillispie said these jobs heavily depend on local approval of the comprehensive plan amendment and rezoning of the land, as these will unlock additional investment. He encouraged people to send resumes and letters of interest to info@aehipower.com and to send supportive testimony to Payette County at lroyston@payettecounty.org pr imachuca@payettecounty.org prior to the Dec. 10 deadline. AEHI also expects to have an informational video up on its Web site www.aehipower.com by Tuesday.

“We have lots of investors, including large institutional investors, who are watching the approval process closely,” Gillispie said. “Naturally, they are seeing if we can at least make it over the first hurdle before they consider loaning money for site prep work.”

AEHI considered building a plant in Owyhee County in 2007 and early 2008, until discovery of a geological fault stopped the project. With no other suitable sites in Owyhee County, the company turned its efforts to Elmore County, where the rezone request has been delayed for over a year with no vote on the application. Nevertheless, the company has spent a total of $10 million in these two counties to date – and most of the money was spent in Idaho, creating the equivalent of approximately 200 jobs.

“The closer companies and contractors are to Payette County, the more employment priority we will give them, and those located in the county will get highest priority of all,” Gillispie said. “We will also be going through a stack of hundreds of resumes we have collected from people at a jobs booth in April, and resumes and letters of interest people have sent us over the years.”

AEHI has filed to amend the Payette County comprehensive plan and rezone some 500 acres of a 5,100 acre parcel; the remaining 4,600 acres will remain ag and serve as a buffer.

At a hearing last week before the county planning and zoning commission, about two dozen Payette County and Idaho residents said the plant is needed to bring safe, secure employment and clean industry to the county. The P and Z commission will discuss the issue on Thursday, Dec. 10 and are expected to make a recommendation to the Payette County Commission on that date.

The county commission will hold another hearing and vote on the rezone, possibly by year’s end. Rezone approval will then allow pre-COLA (Nuclear Regulatory Commission Application) preparations to begin in the first quarter of 2010.

“As current national polls show 75 percent of Americans support new nuclear power plants, communities are openly inviting nuclear developers to consider their location as a potential site,” Gillispie said. “It is certainly refreshing to see this change, but not surprising considering the extensive benefits of these plants. It is apparent our new Idaho county is up to the competitive challenge in processing our application in a timely fashion.”

The nuclear industry is already putting people to work. According to the Nuclear Energy Institute, “nuclear energy is one of the few bright spots in the US economy – expanding rather than contracting.” An NEI report says the prospect of new plant construction in has already stimulated considerable investment and job creation among companies that supply the nuclear industry:  “Over the last several years, the nuclear industry has invested over $4 billion in new nuclear plant development and plans to invest approximately $8 billion in the next several years to be in a position to start construction in 2011-2012.” In the course of this, NEI said, “private investment in new nuclear power plants has created an estimated 14,000-15,000 jobs.” The number of new jobs “will expand dramatically after 2011 when the first wave of these new nuclear projects starts construction.”

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (www.alternateenergyholdings.com)

Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources. The company is the nation’s only publicly traded independent nuclear power plant developer willing to build power plants in non-nuclear states. Other projects include, Energy Neutral which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (www.energyneutralinc.com), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generation), and International Reactors, which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications. Also, AEHI China, headquartered in Beijing, develops joint ventures to produce nuclear plant components and consults on nuclear power.

“Safe Harbor” Statement: This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby. Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate.

 

Letter to investors September 11, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, China, Chinese nuclear energy, economic benefits, Elmore County, international, Investment news, nuclear industry.
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I sent a letter to investors recently. Keeping people informed about our company, its goals and status is an important to us.

September 9, 2009

Dear AEHI Stockholder,

First, let me thank you so much for your investment in AEHI. The company has several nuclear projects underway including our lead site in Idaho, as well as Colorado, a desalination reactor in Mexico and a Tar Sands reactor in Canada to remove trapped oil.

We also formed Energy Neutral, Inc last year to install wind, solar and geothermal heat pumps on homes and offices to eliminate energy bills. Currently, we plan to build our first energy free model home starting the first of October to demonstrate we can construct buildings with no power bills at essentially the same price as those with energy bills. This will help launch our first energy neutral subdivision. The Energy Neutral Trade Mark name is pending as well.

The Idaho reactor, Idaho Energy Complex, is in the process of seeking local approval and we expect it by year’s end. After the Elmore County site approval was delayed due to process problems, we began looking at other sites and now have three additional Idaho counties who are extremely interested in having our plant. A little competition is always healthy. In addition, we are reviewing state lands for potential sites. After two years of educating Idaho citizens along with support from the national media and key state leaders, we have no doubt that an approved site will happen in Idaho soon and we will be adding staff locally to accommodate. We have a funding commitment from Source Capital for the site.

In July, we opened an office in Beijing, China with some investors as AEHI China to facilitate joint ventures for nuclear components among other things and large institutional investors. With the support of the Chinese government nuclear officials, we have several companies who are interested in working with us. I now travel to China every couple of months to facilitate these deals. Also, we are in the process of negotiating on the price to bring the Korean advanced reactor, APR 1400, to the US. This reactor will be lower than the cost of the other reactors currently in the US market making us more than competitive with any new source of electricity in the country. As a backup, we have begun to talk with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries about their advanced reactor as well. Further, we have a large energy trust that is willing to loan us up to $5 billion for the plant construction phase.

Lastly, in lieu of going on the London Plus Exchange as mentioned in my last letter, we are starting the process for our first public stock offering (IPO) for later this year and a move to the American Stock Exchange. This will open the stock up to institutional and more international investors by the first quarter of 2010 allowing us to leave the penny stock category.

As you can see there is plenty of positive news in the making, we will publicly announce this information as it unfolds. If you would like some more AEHI stock or have qualified investor friends, the price is at its lowest from the company at 5 cents per share with no broker fee or volume limit like in the market. This offer will end October 31 when we file for our public offering. We doubt this price will ever be available again. Also, if you have an unrestricted investment 401K or any IRA you can transfer funds to AEHI stock as well.

Just send an e-mail to invest@aehipower.com or call 208-939-9311for more information and PPM, or you can just mail a check to AEHI if an existing investor. If you are an investor you can add to your holdings for as little as $1000 or any amount above that minimum. New investors need to review the PPM.

Again, thanks for your support as we try to help the country with jobs and clean, low cost energy that will also assist us with energy independence.

Best regards,

Don Gillispie

Expanding opportunities August 6, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, Elmore County, Energy policy, nuclear industry, Politics and nuclear.
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Anyone who knows me, knows I am not a complacent person. While our application in Elmore County remains in play as much as ever, it has been a year and we have no clear commitment from the county. Our duty to our stockholders, to our principles and to the people of Idaho requires us to move forward with consideration of other sites.

NEWS RELEASE

For 9:15 am

August 6, 2009

AEHI’s Idaho Nuclear Plant Offered Multiple Sites

Boise, Idaho, August 6, 2009 – Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (OTC: AEHI.PK): AEHI is pleased  to announce several Idaho counties and the state have recently offered lands for AEHI’s nuclear plant following delays in local approval at the current site in Elmore County.

AEHI CEO and president Don Gillispie said, “It is certainly exciting to have so many in Idaho recognize the tremendous benefits of a next generation, environmentally friendly nuclear plant including high paying jobs, great tax revenue; and abundant, low cost, clean power in a region that is critically short on base load energy options. Elmore County’s delay has created a friendly competition for our plant. We are now looking at two additional sites outside of the current county that may actually receive local approval before the existing site.”

AEHI’s site engineering contractor is completing their assessments so we can move forward in a timely manner on these new nuclear plant locations.

Also, the company has also been in contact with several non-nuclear utilities who are considering nuclear plants instead of continuing to invest in the rising cost of carbon plants going forward and need nuclear experienced partners.

“This is likely to be an increasing trend as primarily fossil based utilities realize nuclear is the only viable option for clean base load power today. While nuclear prices are affordable and stable, fossil-fuel prices continue to rise dramatically and fewer carbon base load plants negatively impacts reliability for their customers,” says Gillispie.

About Alternate Energy Holdings, Inc. (www.alternateenergyholdings.com)

Alternate Energy Holdings develops and markets innovative clean energy sources.  Current projects include the Idaho Energy Complex (an advanced nuclear plant and bio-fuel generation facility), Energy Neutral which removes energy demands from homes and businesses (www.energyneutralinc.com), Colorado Energy Park (nuclear and solar generating plants) and International Reactors, Inc., which assists developing countries with nuclear reactors for power generation, production of potable water and other suitable applications.

This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Sections 27A & 21E of the amended Securities and Exchange Acts of 1933-34, which are intended to be covered by the safe harbors created thereby.  Although AEHI believes that the assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements contained herein are reasonable, there can be no assurance that these statements included in this press release will prove accurate.

US Investor Relations:

208-939-9311

invest@aehipower.com

Opinion roundup July 17, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, Agriculture, economic benefits, Elmore County, Energy policy, environmentalists, Mountain Home News, renewable energy, Snake River Alliance, Water policy, Wind energy.
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While our rezone application moves through the process at Elmore County, I thought I would post some letters to the editor and columns that have appeared lately.

Idaho Statesman, July 16, 2009
Enough delays: Approve Elmore County plant

During an Elmore County commissioners’ meeting, supporters of the nuclear power plant outnumbered opponents 5-to-1 and 1,600 petition signatures were submitted in support. Yet, after a year of hearings, the answer from commissioners was the comprehensive plan is outdated and go back to square one. Those opposing are few: a discounted far-left environmental group and a handful of Hammett farmers who support nuclear power but want it constructed in a different location. From the hearings I have attended, radio debates I’ve listened to, and discussions with both farmers and Hammett residents, their responses are loud and clear: the majority of Idahoans are in favor of the power plant and they recognize that this is our big chance to attract large companies who bring stable jobs but need more than what Idaho Power can provide them with. It’s what Idaho has been looking for and it’s what Idaho desperately needs to lead the Northwest and the United States in clean power. My plea to the commissioners is to please stop stalling by appeasing a few and start representing the majority voice. Let us help ourselves to have a brighter future by approving this power plant.

KEVIN F. AMAR, Meridian

Mountain Home News, July 15, 2009
If you want growth, nuclear power plant is viable option

Dear editor:
As I sit here on Saturday morning, June 20, 2009, I look outside my window and see Idaho’s energy future. At least the future that many near-sighted folks want us to put all our faith and trust. It is completely still with nary a whisper of wind to turn even the most efficient wind turbine and so overcast that solar power couldn’t power up an LED bulb.

Naive, I am not. I know this is not the norm for Elmore County; but to set so much reliance on wind, water and solar cannot be our standard for the future of energy for the Pacific Northwest, Western United States, or even the United States as a whole

We cannot afford any more coal powered plants — that is a given. We must invest in other means of powering our society with the electrical demands we have established. Whether for our homes, computers, cell phones, mobile phones, or even the increased future of hybrid or solely electric vehicles — we need electricity! That fact will not go away lest we make the conscious decision to revert back to the 1800s. We can do that, but mind you, it will make it very difficult to continue advances (or even sustain our current abilities) in medicine or just how we live from day to day. If we minimize production, whatever electricity we might have given to us would go first to the established leadership of our county, second to the military, third to health care and finally to Joe Average — come to think of it, it reminds me of how things were divided in Stalinist Russia.

I have heard the discussions before the P&Z, the County Commissioners, read the articles, blogs and opinions in the Mountain Home News and watched the DVD. I’ve listened to the arguments, pro and con, that take place throughout the county and I must say that the controversy over a rezone application has this whole county stymied.

I have seen how people outside of Elmore County have been brought in and have gotten deep into our business. Were they invited — yes, however; when the final decision is made, are they going to be living here to deal with the first-hand consequences of that decision? NO, they won’t!

I have lived in several areas around the United States and around the world. I have lived in areas of extreme prosperity and in utter poverty — and as a personal preference, I chose the comforts of prosperity. I heard it said at one meeting that, “…electricity is overrated.” We, in these United States, are accustomed to many hi-tech devices that we may not know how they work, it just suits our cause when and because they work. I’m not an expert, but I think it requires electricity to take such things as X-rays for proper dental work, broken bone manipulation or detailed neurological procedures. I seem to remember that farmers need electricity to run the water pumps for their irrigation lines in order to get to the point of harvest of hay, corn, wheat or potatoes. I know it is very time consuming to milk dairy cattle by hand and when you have upwards of 5,000 or 6,000 head of cattle that require two milkings per day it can be a VERY time consuming job, unless a dairy has the financial resources to employ hundreds of workers and we wish to pay $10 or more for a gallon of milk.

Since the time I arrived in Idaho in 1997, my power bill has tripled. When I arrived, I too asked the question of why isn’t wind or solar energy being harnessed. The standard response was hydro power is so cheap and plentiful.

So in 12 years, we’ve experienced drought, population growth, economic downturn and a serious lack to decisively invest into new sources of power. We are now so far behind the power curve it’s pitiful. To have known it would come to this level of disparity was unthinkable. No one could have known, but we did have the knowledge and resources available during the good years that could have made these tough times a bit more bearable, had we prepared.

I know the issues of rezone, water use, nuclear power, availability of suitable farm land all have their supporters and opponents to some degree, but the desired advancement throughout time has been this: we seek to make better, to use more efficiently, to build in a margin of safety wherever possible.

If we seek to “do it right,” I believe the co-existence of these issues is entirely possible, plausible and suitable for Elmore County.

Fears, yes, they exist because the human factor exists. But if we become so captivated by those fears that we become frozen in place rather than being motivated to exercise caution and seek safety at every turn to make it better, we can go forward with an expectation of success for everyone.

Of all the nuclear power facilities in the world — have all been failures? Have all been shut down because of fears of Chernobyl or Three Mile Island? Have we not learned from the mistakes that were made of improper design? Has not the Nuclear Regulatory Commission been involved to inspect and certify plants for the public’s safety?

Our world is constantly changing. I enjoy the rural lifestyle of Elmore County and even get fed up with traffic surges that happen twice daily throughout the workweek. But change required stoplights to be installed, road maintenance and improvements to be accomplished; all because we are growing county and that is already a fact of life.

If we want to keep our status quo, then we need to limit our household growths to 1 or 2 children, mandated by law (I think that idea was called Zero Population Growth — back in the ’70s and ’80s; it didn’t work) — reminds me of current day China. Mountain Home has about doubled in size since the 1990s and will probably continue to grow as time goes on. This doesn’t even include the rest of southwestern Idaho, which has seen a marked growth since the mid-1990s.

Change is inevitable and with change comes new requirements. Satisfaction of those requirements must be met and for an economy that means taxes, or housing, or jobs, or transportation, or construction or a myriad of things to meet those requirements.

So what do we do? We have a company that wishes to come into Elmore County (it really didn’t matter to this company where they came in as was evidenced by the Owyhee County course of events and to know that they were invited) to take a piece of land that is not prime and to establish an enterprise on that land.

If it was prime farmland, people would be scrambling at every opportunity to obtain and farm the land. It is land that does have farmable soil and relatively good position to highway and rail support. But the slope of the landscape causes high water drainage and proximity to the Snake River, which funnels the air and causes high evaporation of the remaining moisture content greatly decreases the viable use of this parcel of land for great farming purposes.

This company proposes to level the land, build a viable enterprise, boost the economy and improve the infrastructure of Elmore County. Would they be so determined in their efforts to complete this venture unless they were serious? Fact or fiction?

If you don’t want to promote growth, provide jobs and make improvements to Elmore County, then takes these objectives out of your plans, otherwise; make the plans coincide properly with these objectives, allow the rezone, and move forward.

Roy D. Newer II

Mountain Home News, July 15, 2009
Nuclear power plnt would be a boon to local economy

Dear editor:
This past spring, I spent quite a bit of time doing community organizing work in Elmore County on the rezone for Alternate Energy Holdings Inc.’s proposed power plant. This included visiting Elmore County towns for petition signatures and showing people how they could get involved in the effort to bring well-paying jobs and clean industry to Elmore County.

It was hard work and exciting, but I wasn’t emotionally prepared for the poverty I would see going door-to-door in Glenns Ferry and Hammett. In homes, food lines, businesses and on the street, I came across hardworking people very worried about their futures and how they would keep a roof over their heads. Many were seasonal agricultural workers.

Economic development is a social justice issue. Many times, influential people who run the established order want to keep things the way they are. That’s not necessarily a bad thing especially if, like Elmore County farmers, they work hard, employ people and produce a needed product like food.

However, if the established order also includes keeping people in poverty, there is something very, very wrong with that. One way to address it is through government programs. But for people to be truly economically self-sufficient, they need family-wage jobs with benefits. A power plant with 500 direct jobs, 1,500 spin-off jobs and average wages of $80,000 is one way to do it.

There is great need: according to Census Bureau data, poverty rates in the Glenns Ferry and Hammett ZIP codes are between 17 and 21 percent, well above the 12 percent state average (http://tinyurl.com/nra2jg). Of course, there are other ways to provide these jobs and if anyone else genuinely wants to provide family-wage jobs with a new industry, I urge them to submit their plans.

Also, the industries that create these family-wage jobs are taxed at much higher industrial and commercial rates. Those taxes pay for school, fire, police, parks, libraries, planning, administration, roads and lowering the taxes of everyone else. Currently, agricultural taxes simply don’t provide this level of local government funding. A power plant should also go above and beyond tax obligations and construct public buildings, establish scholarships and run a foundation for the privilege of being in a community.

It’s sad to hear people say, “The nuclear plant won’t hire Elmore people,” as though Elmore residents can’t work in a security-conscious, technically-oriented setting. I think Elmore residents are among the best qualified for nuclear plant jobs, because many are veterans or used to work at Mountain Home Air Force Base. A nuclear plant has many military aspects, including extreme security consciousness; a highly trained, armed security force; and strong safety culture.

Most jobs at a nuclear plant don’t require a college degree and some don’t require high levels of training: foodservice, janitors, landscaping and materials handling. Other jobs need training ranging from certification to advanced college degrees: mechanics, security officers, technicians, office workers, pipefitters, attorneys, managers, electricians or nuclear physicists. We believe Elmore residents already qualify for the vast majority of these jobs. We hope bright Elmore County youths will be able to return home and work at our plant or spin-off industries. In addition, the plentiful power from a nuclear plant will attract other industry.

Best of all, agriculture can continue as it always has, although wages for ag jobs may rise in a competitive job market. Our nuclear plant would occupy just 200 acres. As is common with nuclear plants, the land around ours will continue to be farmed and create a security buffer. Interestingly, the American Farm Bureau calls for increased use of nuclear power (http://tinyurl.com/kokgnq).

Environmental groups normally align themselves with social justice causes. But in this case, some are working alongside a few Hammett-area farmers to, in effect, keep struggling people from accessing better-paid jobs and opportunity. In this clash of principles, the struggling families of Elmore County have been on the losing side.

The environmental groups might say “We’re not against family-wage jobs, but a nuclear plant isn’t the way to do it.” To which I respond: If you cared to ask the struggling families of Elmore County what they think and want, you might not be so eager to tell them no.

Martin Johncox,

Boise

(Editor’s note: Johncox handles public relations for AEHI).

About Elmore County’s Comprehensive Plan June 9, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, Agriculture, approval process, economic benefits, Elmore County, nuclear industry, rural nuclear, Snake River Alliance, Solar energy, Wind energy.
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(We submitted this opinion to the Mountain Home News today for publication tomorrow.)

The Elmore County Commission said some surprising things Monday. Since they can’t hear any more testimony, it is likely my words won’t make it to them. But it would be helpful, whether or not this project succeeds, to clarify a few things.

The Commissioners correctly pointed out on several occasions the comprehensive plan appears to conflict with itself. That is to be expected in a complex effort like land use planning, but it doesn’t have to be that way. As I will talk about, our rezone proposal actually does conform to the comprehensive plan because our development would provide steady, well-paying jobs; will greatly improve the local tax base; won’t threaten the rural way of life so important to Elmore County residents; and we have addressed concerns about possible future misuse of the land.

The Commission asked their attorney for an opinion as to whether or not they can restrict future uses of the land. The Commissioners are concerned that if they rezone the land for industrial use and the nuclear plant isn’t developed, the landowner could apply to build some undesirable use and the commission would have little ability to stop it.

This is a reasonable concern. However, we addressed it early on in the process. Along with our application, we submitted a development agreement. The agreement makes clear that if we do not build a nuclear power plant on the land, then it must revert to agricultural zoning.

Elected officials are understandably reluctant to deviate from their comprehensive plans. However, they also know there will come times to make reasonable exceptions. We believe this is such a time. The current comprehensive plan, however well-intentioned, did not foresee the possibility of an ambitious and economically significant proposal such as ours, the most expensive single piece of private infrastructure ever proposed for Idaho.

The designated industrial location, Simco Road, has very little water; a 20-mile-long pipe would need to be constructed, presenting insurmountable safety and right-of-way concerns. The site has geologic issues that also make it difficult to site a nuclear plant there. Interestingly, much more intrusive uses, such as industrial wind farms and natural gas plants, may be located anywhere in the county without a heavy industrial designation. This is especially puzzling, as a nuclear plant emits no smoke, noise, dust or odors and takes up very little space.

Another commissioner said the people of Hammett have spoken overwhelmingly against the rezone. While many Hammett-area farmers spoke as individuals (and included their feelings again as members of a group), that is by no means representative of Hammett the town, where many of the workers on these farms actually live.

Of the 1,600 signatures we gathered in favor of the rezone (half from Elmore County), we estimate at least 50 came from in and around Hammett, where our community organizing efforts found people, many of them agricultural workers, desperate for stable, well-paying jobs. These figures suggest national polls about nuclear power, which routinely show 70%-plus support.

One of the commissioners’ least enviable jobs is to balance competing interests, each of them important. Should they (as our opponents say) approve an industry that would destroy the rural way of life? Or should they adopt a clean, stable source of energy and the jobs that go with it? Unfortunately, our opponents have presented this as an either-or choice when, in fact, it is not. In terms of being an industrial use, we will no more impose upon Elmore County’s rural way of life than a cheese plant or an air force base (which we whole heartedly support as a veteran run organization).

If the farmers could demonstrate the plant we propose would harm their way of life, they might have a case for keeping hundreds of their fellow county residents from holding power plant jobs. As it stands, however, nuclear plants are excellent neighbors. Of the 1,300 acres proposed in our rezone, about 200 would be for the actual plant. The remaining land would consist of ponds and farms, as is common in the predominantly rural settings where nuclear plants are located. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, it costs 1.8 cents to produce a kilowatt-hour of electricity with nuclear power, and that power is produced more than 90 percent of the time (http://tinyurl.com/2pgc8k). That’s a significant benefit to farmers

Indeed, Elmore County farms have for decades abutted extremely intensive heavy-industrial uses with no problems. I’m speaking of Mountain Home Air Force Base, Despite the general mistrust of government in our society, the Air Force Base has been a good neighbor and is a pillar of the region’s economy. Safe to say, MHAFB would have a hard time fitting in the Simco Road location.

One commissioner also expressed concern about how construction would affect local services. Any sort of significant project will certainly impose some burdens and we have suggested ways to address them. Ideas include paying money directly to the county to reduce the bill for all taxpayers as compensation for disruption; job training; a community center; scholarships; direct infrastructure funding; and a committee to oversee service needs (for details, see my open letter to the people of Hammett on my blog at www.cleanidahoenergy.wordpress.com). Not to mention, these burdens would pale in comparison to the benefits specified in the next paragraph.

Current farms in Elmore County produce 2.86 jobs (some seasonal) per acre, or about 4 jobs at the current location. Our plant would produce 500-year round jobs at the site and 5,000 peak jobs per year during construction; $558 million in local payroll and labor income; and $205 million in local ripple payroll income. The plant would also create an additional 1,754 full-time support jobs and massive improvements in schools, police, fire and other infrastructure funding.

The irony isn’t lost on me that the commission these days is also holding meetings on how to deal with a pressing budget crisis. Our proposal would start putting people to work immediately and increase the economic security for the all residents of Elmore County.

One of the Commissioners made another important statement. If Elmore County residents – and presumably the Snake River Alliance – wish to see farmland kept undeveloped, they should probably consider forming a land trust or other legal vehicle to accomplish it. To restrict private property rights for that reason is not a wise use of power.

Things are going well for AEHI. Last week, we signed an agreement with Source Capital Group Inc. to raise money for the project. The funds will cover land, water rights and engineering services to obtain Nuclear Regulatory Commission approval to construct and operate an advanced nuclear plant in Elmore County, Idaho, estimated to total some $70 million. Every company that has undertaken the NRC application process has successfully completed it and received a construction/operation license.

We see a bright future for Elmore County, one that many communities in America share. It is a future of economic security and low-cost energy, with a nuclear plant quietly, cleanly and dependably powering its farms, homes and businesses. We hope the Elmore County Commission votes for this future and approves our rezone.

Snake River Alliance does Idaho no favors June 3, 2009

Posted by cleanidahoenergy in AEHI, Agriculture, anti-renewable energy, economic benefits, Greenfield nuclear development, Mountain Home News, renewable energy, Snake River Alliance.
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[We submitted this opinion to the Mountain Home news last month but space constraints kept it from being published.]

Democracy gives people a lot of latitude in how to get something done, or to stop it from being done. The events over the last few weeks have been really useful in showing how we and the Snake River Alliance differ on those counts. Heat doesn’t substitute for light and even a group as prickly as the Snake River Alliance should know that a civil tone will help public discussion of important issues like energy.

Our efforts to prepare for the April 20 rezone hearing were aboveboard and successful. We launched a public information campaign to let people know about our table to collect resumes and letters of interest and around 500 showed up and wore stickers supporting AEHI. I spoke at clubs, groups, associations, business and anywhere else people would have me, and not all of these venues were friendly.

We collected 1,600 signatures through much hard work going door-to-door, going to food lines, going to workplaces, going to places the SRA wouldn’t bother going. We produced an informational video and mailed it to each household in Elmore County. We sent a letter to every resident of Hammett to address their specific concerns. We launched a traditional advertising campaign and used the new tools of social media to get the word out.

In contrast, the Snake River Alliance prepared for the rezone hearing with bizarre and unethical gimmicks. A week or so before the hearing, the SRA complained to the Glenns Ferry Police Department that I shoved SRA employee Liz Woodruff at a March 10 Glenns Ferry City Council meeting – in a room full of the public, city officials and police officers, no less! The authorities did their duty and, after interviewing me and other people, found the accusation without merit. Clearly, the SRA was fishing for an “October surprise” a week before the rezone hearing, hoping to smear my reputation and throw the meeting into disarray.

These shenanigans have no place in public policy. It probably didn’t help the SRA that Mrs. Woodruff on March 24 publicly apologized to the Glenns Ferry City Council for her childish behavior at that March 10 council meeting, where she sought to disrupt my presentation.

All this is relevant because it speaks to the SRA’s involvement in the public process. As hard as they try to keep a veneer of civility, they openly and behind-the-scenes do what they can do disrupt the local process. Apparently, they were able to restrain themselves more or less for the rezone hearing, but they and their supporters formed “groups” to get more speaking time. Then, individual members of the “groups” spoke, violating the principle the county established for recognizing groups .

Clearly, the SRA does best when surrounded by supporters and friends, but their thin-skinned nature leads them to do some strange things. For example, sometimes the SRA seems immune to common sense. To emphasize that nuclear plants are a good fit with rural areas, we showed pictures of cows grazing a stone’s throw from nuclear plants and Andrea Shipley’s response was to say “the property at issue is not grazed by cows” (actually, cows graze the only adjacent private land). As the SRA well knows, our plant would take up around 200 acres, with the remainder of the 1,300 acre parcel to remain farmland.

To say our plant would “upend surrounding ag uses” is preposterous. For the real story on how our plant would affect the area, see my open letter to the citizens of Hammett at http://www.cleanidahoenergy.wordpress.com. There are plenty of photos of nuclear plants surrounded by hayfields, wildlife habitat, estuaries and near small towns (yes, we’re well aware there are no estuaries in Elmore County).

In the face of our campaign, the SRA says the jobs will never materialize – but the SRA is working as hard as it can to stop the jobs from ever materializing. We’ve already put 100 Idahoans to work and as long as investors continue to fund us, that’s their concern, not the SRA’s. They say we haven’t finalized enough details about our plant, but you know if we had every detail plotted out they’d complain we were being presumptuous. At this stage, we are simply seeking to rezone the land, yet they chide us for not having each and every aspect of our plant finalized.

Speaking of our business, Ms. Shipley breathlessly states the obvious in quoting our SEC report, which says “AEHI has limited funds and such funds will not be adequate to carry out the business plan without borrowing significant funds. The ultimate success of AEHI may depend upon its ability to raise additional capital … and it could fail.” OK, so we openly admit don’t have enough money to build a nuclear reactor and need more investment to build it. So? Utilities, developers, companies and anyone else building anything must seek investment capital as well.

Ms. Shipley is either uneducated about start-up public companies, or she is seeking to misrepresent our funding picture. We are the only publicly owned company in the nation seeking to build an independent nuclear power plant; traditional utilities, for whatever reasons, haven’t constructed enough power plants and we are stepping up to meet the demand. Like any other start-up, we seek investment for what we propose. If we get it, we may succeed, and if we don’t, we fail. Anyone who has run a business, or who is not terribly out-of-touch with business, understands that.

The Snake River Alliance’s contempt for working people is evident in its own site, as well as those of supporters. Among the drawbacks of our plant, according to the SRA’s Jan. 9 news release, would be “thousands of construction workers” in Elmore County (http://tinyurl.com/qxgnm9). I guess if someone has a problem with construction workers, that would be a concern, but to people who are willing to work hard and get something built, it’s an insult. Or, this gem from http://tinyurl.com/p43rar, refers this way to people who came to our table: “To what degree will these curbside applicants feel like darned fools?”

If this is the best the Snake River Alliance can offer, it has grossly underestimated our tenacity, the depth of our support and the necessity of our enterprise.

Ms. Shipley claimed I am “obsessed with counting stickers” but that is the closest she comes to acknowledging the truth: People at the meeting were overwhelmingly supportive of the rezone and the SRA’s vaunted community organizing efforts didn’t produce much in that regard. The best Ms. Shipley can do is to discount our efforts to create jobs and say the jobs won’t come soon enough, or at all, or they won’t be for Elmore residents – while simultaneously doing all she can to stop the jobs from ever coming. Tactically, the SRA was out-hustled, but that in itself means nothing as the ultimate measure of success lies with the Elmore County Commission.

Most valuable are the resumes of hundreds of highly qualified, hardworking Idahoans we collected and hope to call on as soon as we can. They and thousands of other supporters hope we prevail over the SRA and its newfound allies.

Anti-nukes use another two-faced approach when they say nuclear power shouldn’t be pursued because we have no place to store or reprocess the waste, but then they work against storage and reprocessing solutions. It’s worth pointing out Areva is planning for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel in the US (http://tinyurl.com/pwfblo). The firm recently shared with bloggers its conceptual thinking about a 800 ton/year plant which it says is the answer to apparent end of the Yucca Mountain repository project.

Given the traditional antagonism between environmental groups like the SRA and agriculture, it is not surprising Ms. Shipley is out of touch with ag issues. News alert for Ms. Shipley: Farming in Idaho is largely constrained by the high cost of water, because pumping that water is becoming increasingly expensive. Irrigators currently pay close to 4 cents per kilowatt hour, but Idaho Power is asking for an 11.1 percent increase in that rate. Many farmers spend thousands of dollars a month on power costs. According to the U.S. Energy Information Agency, it costs 1.8 cents to produce a kilowatt-hour of electricity with nuclear power, and that power is produced more than 90 percent of the time (http://tinyurl.com/2pgc8k).

This kind of reliable low-cost power is exactly what high-lift irrigators and other farmers need to stay economically competitive. According to the American Wind Energy Association, wind costs around 5 cents per kilowatt hour (http://tinyurl.com/kyg8u) with federal subsidies – when it’s blowing, which is around 20 percent of the time on average. Ms. Shipley should know business can’t operate under those power terms; we only make it work by importing half our energy for out-of-state coal plants.

It strains belief that Ms. Shipley would claim “Idaho is not out of power … Idaho has ample electricity resources.” Perhaps she should tell that laughable claim to the two major employers who bypassed southern Idaho in 2007 because Idaho Power couldn’t provide electricity! Surely, she is just as disappointed as the rest of us about the loss of those jobs.

The fact that Idaho imports half its energy is proof enough that we need to develop our own dispatchable baseload resources in-state. It’s no secret that Idaho Power hasn’t developed a base-load power plant in Idaho in at least 30 years, choosing instead buying shares in out-of-state coal plants. I really can’t blame them; after getting a taste of the difficulty in developing a power plant, I can see why Idaho Power has evidently given up on new baseload power in Idaho.

That brings me to my next point, which is that energy developers of all kinds are facing a harder time getting anything built, and no advocacy groups are stepping forward to support them. As you read this, dozens of rural landowners want to “curb enthusiasm for” and ultimately kill plans to plant wind turbines and string a green-field power line segment across the northern Laramie Range in Wyoming (http://tinyurl.com/polydc). The Northern Laramie Range Alliance is fighting wind energy, which the Snake River Alliance points to as the future of energy generation.

Something tells me the Snake River Alliance and its allies won’t be showing up to help these wind power developers – or anyone who’s trying to build a power plant.